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Viewing by month: May 2012
May 29, 2012 | Posted By Posted By David Lemberg, M.S., D.C.

April 2012 brought news of the latest shot fired over the bow of genetic inheritance as we know it. Ever since the discovery of the structure of DNA by Watson and Crick in 1953 and the subsequent elucidation of the triplet nature of the genetic code by Marshall Nirenberg and others in the early 1960s, many scientists have fantasized about obtaining mastery over this primordial biomolecule.

An interim pinnacle of achievement in this hopeful process would be to create a DNA-like molecule whose information content would be both heritable and evolvable. Synthetic Genetic Polymers Capable of Heredity and Evolution presents elegant work along this path which may signal a substantive shift in humankind’s ability to manipulate the language of life.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers graduate online masters in bioethics programs. For more information on the AMBI master of bioethics online program, please visit the AMBI site.

May 29, 2012 | Posted By Ricki Lewis, PhD

 

Hannah Sames, here with her dog Ginger, awaits gene therapy. (photo: Dr. Wendy Josephs)

The pharmaceutical industry rightly calls the stage in drug development between basic research and clinical trials the “Valley of Death.” This is when a potential treatment that’s worked in mice, monkeys, and the like catapults to a phase 1 clinical trial to assess safety. It’s rare.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers graduate online masters in bioethics programs. For more information on the AMBI master of bioethics online program, please visit the AMBI site.

 

May 19, 2012 | Posted By Posted By David Lemberg, M.S., D.C.

We (in America) live in a capitalist society. That is a given. We also live in a democratic society. The Declaration of Independence states that all men [humans] are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights including life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It is not clear that any of these specific rights can be fulfilled when access to a minimum standard of health care is denied, obstructed, or otherwise not available. In the case when health care is available, that care needs to be delivered stripped of any considerations other than those related to providing assistance for that patient.

But in America many ancillary considerations intervene. Care of a patient is confounded by care for special interests, often involving kickbacks (whether in the form of travel expenses, gifts, complimentary lunches and dinners, or even cash payments) rendered by obsequious agents of big pharma or medical device corporations. Worse, on a broader scale, the recent phenomenon of the Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) blithely granting biomedical patents to any and all comers has seriously harmed medical practice and the health of Americans in need.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers graduate online masters in bioethics programs. For more information on the AMBI master of bioethics online program, please visit the AMBI site.

May 14, 2012 | Posted By Posted By David Lemberg, M.S., D.C.

Do we really need more drugs? We can gain some insight into this question by posing a qualifying question: “How’s it working out so far?” The answer is rather obvious: “Not all that well.” Despite spending $2.5 trillion in 2009 on health care, representing almost 18% of our gross domestic product, the life expectancy of Americans ranks #36 worldwide. Numerous developing nations enjoy longer lifespans than we do. (Costa Rica, for example, ranks #30.) On the other end of the spectrum, the New York Times recently reported that the U.S. rate of premature births is comparable to that of developing nations. Regarding this impactful public health issue with long-term consequences for society, the U.S. does worse than any Western European country. The U.S. premature birth rate of 12% is comparable with that in Kenya, and Honduras. In other words, on this measure the overweening technological superiority of our notoriously costly health care system fares no better than that of countries with per capita incomes of $2 a day.

With respect to chronic disease, it is not unreasonable to assert that medical treatment has obtained equivocal results in the population. Statins are a drug class that has demonstrated proven benefit. For persons who have risk factors for atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, statin use effectively reduces the risk of death due to cardiovascular disease, including stroke. Benefits of statin use increases over time. But drug companies want to extend the statin hegemony to include persons at low cardiovascular risk. In other words, global pharmaceutical corporations want physicians to prescribe statins for prevention in otherwise healthy persons.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers graduate online masters in bioethics programs. For more information on the AMBI master of bioethics online program, please visit the AMBI site.

May 2, 2012 | Posted By Michael Brannigan, PhD

The year is 2029. After discussing schedules, I've picked early afternoon April 28 as my day. That works for most of us. My wife will have returned from her conference. My sisters can fly in after their dance recital. My brother rescheduled his interviews.

Cousins can drive in from the coast. Some nieces and nephews can't make it, but that's all right. They're busy. Dr. Landis assured us it would be brief. I'll just take the pill the good doc gives me and fall quickly asleep, peacefully, forever. No pain. I'm doing what's right. It is better for all of us.

As we face dying's three dreads — pain, abandonment, helplessness — what is the practical allure of physician-assisted suicide?

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BIOETHICS TODAY is the blog of the Alden March Bioethics Institute, presenting topical and timely commentary on issues, trends, and breaking news in the broad arena of bioethics. BIOETHICS TODAY presents interviews, opinion pieces, and ongoing articles on health care policy, end-of-life decision making, emerging issues in genetics and genomics, procreative liberty and reproductive health, ethics in clinical trials, medicine and the media, distributive justice and health care delivery in developing nations, and the intersection of environmental conservation and bioethics.
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