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Topic: Government
October 25, 2013 | Posted By Wayne Shelton, PhD

In the summer of 2009 when the Patient Protection Affordable Care Act, also known as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Obamacare, was being widely discussed as a front burner political issue, I attended a town hall meeting held by my congressional representative, a moderate democrat, to listen to public comments before he decided whether or not to support the ACA. In the years following the disappointing implosion of healthcare reform during the Clinton administration, honestly, I did not expect to see the issue of healthcare reform back on the political agenda in my lifetime. So I was eager to attend and lend my support for a bill that would expand healthcare coverage for Americans and to hear my congressman respond to questions. When I arrived I was struck by the number of attendees and even more so by the large number of signs and placards with crude slogans linking ACA death panels, Nazism, killing grandma, etc. It was also striking that many of the people there were local working people who were members of the newly formed Tea Party and fierce opponents of the ACA. The negative views being expressed were passionate and urgent: Passage of the ACA would take our country down a path toward socialism, loss of freedom and government interference into the sacred domain of the physician-patient relationship.

Now that the ACA has passed both chambers of congress, signed by the president and ruled to be constitutional by the Supreme Court, there are still strong efforts by it opponents to stop its implementation. At present, the right wing of Republican Party in the house of representation has been willing to shut down our government and threaten default on our national debt unless the ACA is repealed or delayed. It is instructive to put the recent efforts to derail the ACA into historical context and see them as an extension of a century long effort, led by well-funded special interests groups to motivate American citizens through misinformation and scare tactics to vote against their own interests.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

October 14, 2013 | Posted By Bruce White, DO, JD

Enrollment with the new Affordable Care Act [ACA] exchanges appears to be off to a bad start. It may be that by the time the insurance exchanges and plans take effect early next year, all the glitches may be worked out. However, even at this relatively late date, many questions remain unanswered. Some of the more distressing unanswered questions relate to the availability of expensive medicines

According to The New York Times, several of the states administering exchanges have yet to release information about drug formularies or fully explain which drugs might be excluded. Of the few states that have released this kind off information, some have options that will require patients to pay as much as 50 percent of the costs of the most expensive drugs covered. Of course, there’s no guarantee that some drugs will be included at all.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

June 13, 2013 | Posted By Ricki Lewis, PhD

Earlier today, my “in” box began to fill with info from everyone I’ve ever met letting me know that the Supreme Court had ruled on the Myriad case about patenting the breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. I also received a dozen pitches from PR people offering me all manner of instant interviews with lawyers, doctors, bioethicists, and health care analysts.

No one offered me an interview with a geneticist – a person who knows something about DNA. So being such a person myself, I decided to take a look at the decision. And I found errors – starting right smack in the opening paragraph.

“Scientists can extract DNA from cells to isolate specific segments for study. They can also synthetically create exons-only strands of nucleotides known as composite DNA (cDNA). cDNA contains only the exons that occur in DNA, omitting the intervening exons.”

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

June 7, 2013 | Posted By John Kaplan, PhD

I have commented previously on the stupidity with which some members of congress approach science. I never seem to have any trouble finding new material on this subject. The House Committee on Science, Space and Technology seems to be an especially rich source of such material.  You would think that the members of congress from Oklahoma and Texas would be pretty busy these days. With a huge fertilizer explosion in Texas and the direct hit of a massive EF5 tornado in More, Oklahoma the need for humanitarian aid and rebuilding would be enough to keep Senator Tom Coburn (R-Oklahoma) and Representative Lamar Smith (R-Texas) quite busy, as well they should be. But these guys are nonetheless able to find plenty of time to mess with the operations of the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Senator Coburn initiated this latest episode earlier this year by successfully attaching language to the 2013 appropriation for the National Science Foundation that prohibits funding for any political science research unless the director of the NSF certifies that it relates to national security or economic development. Representative Smith, the chair of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology has now initiated an attempt to apply these principles to the entire portfolio of NSF funding in all disciplines. The current guidelines to reviewers of grant applications for funding by NSF to address the “intellectual merit” of the research proposal as well as its broader impact on society and the scientific community.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

December 27, 2012 | Posted By Bruce D. White, DO, JD

In 2012, the percentage of money spent on providing drugs to patients in the United States continued to rise (Hoffman et al., 2012). However, this is a US trend not seen in other developing countries – such as Canada – where national drug expenditure percentages are slowing year after year (CBC News, 2012). In fact, in Canada, the rate of drug cost growth for this year is the lowest of the last 15 years. 

So, why? Simply put, the American pharmaceutical industry has fueled new drug innovation worldwide for decades. Now, the pharmaceutical companies have less money for research and development and are innovating less. When they do innovate, the companies spend their R&D allocations either on “me too” (imitation) drugs, or very, very expensive drugs for which insurance reimbursement is maximized. Market forces drive both these new drug lines. But now, the R&D well is clearly drying up (Adams, 2011).

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

November 6, 2012 | Posted By John Kaplan, PhD

I recently received a mass mailing from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), an organization that I am a member of.  On the envelope was the statement: “The future of science is at stake.”This seemed pretty dire so I opened the envelope to learn more. The letter was about the possible consequences to science research and development funding as a result of the Budget Control Act of 2011. The Budget Control Act of 2011 is the result of the inability to develop a budget compromise and dictates sequestration of discretionary defense and domestic funding in the absence of such a compromise. It is the act popularly characterized as the “fiscal cliff”. While many are primarily concerned about one side of the budget or the other those who recognize the importance of research and development funding need to be concerned with both. Research and development funding will not only be hit hard by cuts to the domestic funding for budgets of the National Institutes of Health and the National Science foundation but also significant funding through the Department of Defense for biomedical research as well as aerospace and communications. Additional funding cuts to science are likely in the domestic research and development funding which is included in the NASA budget as well as the Departments of Energy and Agriculture. As suggested in the letter there is indeed much at stake. However, the fiscal cliff is not what I thought of when I saw the dire warning on the envelope. 

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit ourwebsite.

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BIOETHICS TODAY is the blog of the Alden March Bioethics Institute, presenting topical and timely commentary on issues, trends, and breaking news in the broad arena of bioethics. BIOETHICS TODAY presents interviews, opinion pieces, and ongoing articles on health care policy, end-of-life decision making, emerging issues in genetics and genomics, procreative liberty and reproductive health, ethics in clinical trials, medicine and the media, distributive justice and health care delivery in developing nations, and the intersection of environmental conservation and bioethics.
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